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26

There's a couple of things at play here Donald Trump shoots from the hip (meaning he doesn't consider the political ramifications before he speaks). Seriously. I could speculate all day about why he would deny a conversation he had, but Trump is well known for contradicting people who work for him, let alone foreign heads of state. There is some sensitivity ...


19

This would appear to be part of Spain's usury legislation. Usury is the practice of lending at unreasonable levels of interest. Lenders offer loans at a very high rate of interest when they have a reasonable expectation that the loan won't be repaid. Thus they need to make sufficient profit on those loans that are repaid to cover losses on bad debts. So if ...


15

Disclaimer: Please do not take the following as condoning Mihai Tudose (Romania PM)'s words. From the links provided in the edit, it is very clear that the title of the question is a notable misrepresentation of the issue. The words are (emphasis mine): "I have sent message that if the Szekler flag flies over the institutions over there, they will all ...


15

Retribution The rationale of the Romanian government in this case is that the individual in question, in her role as head of the Romanian Anti-Corruption agency, has launched investigations on more or less the whole political establishment of Romania. Becoming a major EU prosector would, most probably, give her more investigative power. And that's ...


13

James K's answer is correct about the reasons in favor of limiting interest rates1. That said, since Spain's laws are specifically quoted, I would like to give some additional data. First, there are three different rules: for remunerative interest: what is usually understood as the interest. for 'late' interest: interest to pay if the borrower delays in ...


12

I'll admit I'm not up to date on Romania specific, but the purpose of Free Speech is to criticize public policy and politicians. Any government that does not allow citizens to use colorful language to criticizes political organizations but claims it respects Free Speech probably doesn't truly have free speech. HOWEVER Most license plates are issued by a ...


11

Since you ask for specific examples, being French, I will pull the Alain Juppé card. In 2004, Alain Juppé was tried for the felony of abuse of public funds, when he was head of the RPR and the RPR illegally used personnel provided by the City of Paris for running its operations. He was convicted and sentenced to an 18-month suspended jail sentence, the ...


10

One of the roles of a diplomat is to be an expert on the country to which they are sent. It would be the job of the diplomats to advise the Israeli Prime Minister if there were any topics that should not be discussed, as they were ultra vires of the Romanian PM. The extent to which this was done by Israeli diplomats prior to the Romanian PM’s visit is ...


10

Whenever it wants to. Governments often avoid comment on purely internal affairs of other countries, such as election campaigns. But this is no more than a polite convention of diplomacy, and it has many exceptions. The USA routinely comments on the internal policies of other nations. For example, the State Department publishes reports evaluating human ...


10

I just read the transcript and the answer is very obvious. It is very easy to understand the President because he is not keeping anything back. What he says is what he is thinking. When President Trump says he did not discuss it, it means that he has not said anything about it. What President Iohannis says he mentioned the issue, as in he brought it up ...


9

How Do Emergency Ordinances Work? Romania's emergency ordinances (discussed here, but also in the Romanian constitution Art.115 (3) - (8) ) have the full force of ordinary laws. Unlike a normal law, the executive (the government) passes them first with the legislature voting on them after the government has approved them. That is the "emergency" part - the ...


9

Apparently the answer is "no". There's a database with conditions attached to loans, and the 2009 Standby Agreement (SBA) with Romania had plenty of those, including pension (legislation) reform, reform of Romania's central tax collection agency (ANAF); these were present since the original May 2009 agreement. There were also some very specific conditions ...


8

The obvious precedent would be the German Reunification. However, there were some differences: The division of Germany was tied into the Four Power agreements after WWII. West Germany always took great care to point out that the division was temporary and resolved it in the 2+4 talks. Technically, East Germany joined West Germany using a provision that had ...


7

Europe is full of this kind of "specialists". While not that high ranking an official this one is so outrageous that he has to be included in such a list: Otto Wiesheu from Bavaria. In 1983 while being general secretary of his party he drove under the influence of alcohol, caused an accident and killed one person and injured heavily another one. He was ...


6

There are two theories about minimum wage. Minimum wages increase wages without any offsetting reduction in employment. Minimum wages reduce employment, since they outlaw jobs at lower pay. While some jobs may increase hourly pay, they will reduce hours or eliminate other jobs to compensate. People who hold to the latter theory may well want to ...


6

While anything is possible, if the ruling party feels secure enough to pass such a blatantly corrupt law then the protest on its own will probably not deter them. While plotting on how to pass a law might be secret, at some point the law must go through Parliament and be put in the public record, no matter how low key they make it or what bill they ...


6

Article 7 of the Treaty of the European Union deals with how the EU can sanction member-states which violate the general ethical principles of the EU. When 80% of the European Council (member-states) and 50% of the European Parliament agree that a country is violating the EU core principles, the EU Council is able to suspend any of the rights (but none of ...


6

It can certainly be considered as xenophobia by some - one prior example that springs to mind is in 2009 when David Cameron, then Leader of the UK Opposition, adopted a German accent to mock the Labour party's planned initiative to introduce national identity cards: In a mock voice apparently attempting to mimic a Nazi officer, Cameron asked an audience in ...


5

It is possible, but would mean reporting a fake budget to national parliaments by governments at the national level. Current budget rules With Maastricht (1992) and European Fiscal Compact (2012) treaties, national budgets have to be strictly checked by the EU before being approved, since all national economies are linked and if one loses money/makes ...


5

Look at it the other way around. The EU offers work permits to highly skilled immigrants. How do you define what a "highly skilled immigrant" is? Easy, it is anybody who can earn 1.5 times the average annual gross salary with those skills. Otherwise there could be endless squabbling if a concert violoncellist is more or less skilled than a college-dropout ...


5

SHORT ANSWER Yes there was. You can see it in this fact sheet. in 2002, in anticipation of increased funding, OBO developed a design prototype of a standard embassy, modeled after the recently completed U.S. Embassy in Kampala, Uganda. That design incorporated all the Department’s security, code, and functional standards and requirements. There ...


5

The Romanian constitution has in Article 30: (1) Freedom of expression of thoughts, opinions, or beliefs, and freedom of any creation, by words, in writing, in pictures, by sounds or other means of communication in public are inviolable. Subject to (6) Freedom of expression shall not be prejudicial to the dignity, honour, privacy of a person, and to the ...


5

I think most countries do not allow expatriates to vote at all. The idea is that you are not affected by most of what the government of your home country does, so you should have little or no say about it. Think about everything that the Romanian government does which stays in Romania. I'm not sure about Romania specifically but I'll bet that includes ...


5

In Germany, there are two factors at work: Prosecutors, judges, and parole boards have some discretion if they send or keep a suspect or convict in prison. While they are supposed to look only at the particulars of the case, overcrowding and a high workload might let them dismiss cases that would otherwise lead to prison sentences. When suspects are tried ...


5

More abstractly, given two states, how can they make legally bidding agreements, if in one of the countries a deep state exists, which can make any agreement of the elected political leadership invalid? If there is a power that is higher than the official leadership of a country, and that power can and will regularly override any agreements between the ...


5

"Deep state" theories spouted by the illiberal Orban and similar alt-right exponents elsewhere are usually hardly credible, being more likely to be conspiracy theories. Next thing you're going to tell us is that Soros (another favorite scare crow of Orban) runs Romania too. You haven't provided any evidence for your assertions about goes on in ...


5

This is a Romanian perspective I think there is no actual connection between backing Klaus Iohannis and notifying the Constitutional Court about the Roman Catholic Theological High School in Târgu Mureş. Backing Klaus Iohannis is very good for the party because he is a very popular politician who proved his efficiency as a mayor in Sibiu and has clear pro-...


5

What might be seen as "the usual suspects" of Hungary & Poland also voiced concerns, as well as the Czech Republic. In December, they threatened to block the deal entirely. Although all four countries seem to accept the threat of global warming, and indeed the need for a reduction of carbon emissions, they objected to the perceived imbalance of the ...


4

SJuan has a provided an excellent answer, but it happens that I followed local politics more when ex-Prime Minister was appointed and after that, so I can add some extra information: I do not know the specific Romanian laws, but the EU forbids the death penalty. There is nothing unclear about this: Romanian has abolished death penalty immediately after ...


4

I am mostly speculating, but one possible reason is the following: Kovesi is politically close to those circles in Romania which claim themselves to be pro-EU and pro-Western. She had a strong support for example from Dacian Ciolos, the fraction leader of Renew Europe, who has a french wife and especially strong political connections to France. Western ...


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