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To more directly answer the question of why Democrats are considered the "majority" party in the Senate (and thus, why Schumer is considered the Majority Leader,) it's because the two technically "independent" Senators (Bernie Sanders from Vermont and Angus King from Maine) caucus with the Democrats and, as such, agree to vote in favor of ...


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Glossary Term | Floor Leaders floor leaders - The majority leader and minority leader are elected by their respective party conferences to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for their parties and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. By custom, the presiding officer gives the floor leaders priority in obtaining ...


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Because the two independents voted with the democrats for leadership of the senate resulting in a tie vote that was broken by the vice president. https://www.khou.com/article/news/verify/verify-majority-leader-split-senate/526-d1c0c02b-5b19-4863-86da-f942d1994683


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This looks like to be a strategy document setting out the vision of the vision of the Biden adminisration - hence the 'ambiguities'. The strategy is Keynesian with large scale expenditure on public infrastructure partly predicated on the changes required to the economy due to climate change. This sounds very much like the much heralded Green New Deal. I ...


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It appears that no bill exactly tracking the President's proposal has been introduced in Congress at this time. Components of his proposed legislation closely track existing legislative bills (e.g. related to Broadband infrastructure), but there is no one bill as I write this that matches it based upon a Govtrack.us search. The President, of course, does not ...


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Before a Bill can become law, it must be passed both by the House of Representatives and the Senate. It can originate in either chamber (except for revenue bills, which must originate from the House), and both chambers have the power to reject a law. After the Bill passes both chambers, the Governor must approve or veto the Bill. If he approves, then it ...


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What was the one bill that Republicans filibustered in 2020? TL; DR: None. Given the total of 328 and the 327 to 1 distribution in John Roberts' tweet, it appears he was referring to number of cloture votes that were taken in the 116th Congress, which ran from January 3, 2019 through January 3, 2021. During this period 328 cloture motions were filed, 327 of ...


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What is legally possible is irrelevant. Once the filibuster is removed there is no likelihood of a subsequent Senate, either Democrat or Republican trying to reinstate it. In 2013 the Demcrats removed the filibuster for Judicial appointments below the Supreme Court and Republicans objected. After becoming that majority party in 2016 no move to restore this ...


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In theory, yes, if Republicans win a simple majority in both Houses of Congress as well as the presidency, they could then repeal this law with a simple majority. A repeal is just another law that says the previous law is no longer valid, and so the rules would be the same for it as for any other law. However, there is a wrinkle. The purpose of the voting ...


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If the Democrats get rid of the filibuster to pass voting rights can the next congress repeal these voting rights with a simple majority? The next Congress? Probably not. The next Congress runs from January 2023 to January 2025, during which Biden will still be President. Even assuming the Republicans win both houses of the legislature, they'll need to have ...


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Including the prior provided answer along with key commentary on this answer: It looks like the Democrats can get rid of the filibuster to pass voting rights. The next congress could repeal this law with a simple majority unless there is a presidential veto. This seems to indicate that voting rights would last at least until the next presidential election. ...


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Yes, they can because that is how congress works, any bill passed by a simple majority can be repealed by a simple majority. All bills can be passed with a simple majority, the filibuster has nothing to do with passing a bill. It is just a procedure that is designed to hold up the vote on a bill by using debate. The problem is with the modern filibuster ...


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The tie-breaking vote that the VP has in the US Senate is set in the Constitution. The filibuster is set out in the rules of the Senate. If the Senate decides to remove the ability to filibuster, it has no impact on the VP having a tie-breaking vote.


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