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1

According to a 2009 survey there were more countries that had (at least then) anti-defection laws. Sometimes these laws give the party a lot of power (to enforce party discipline), e.g. in an extreme case if one is expelled from the party for whatever reason, they lose their parliamentary seat as well. Chief examples of countries with such broad provision ...


-2

As for the question "Is there any other... ": there was such a country, the USSR. There was one party, the CPSU, and by the principle of Democratic Centralism, invented and promoted by the founder of that party, V.I. Lenin, every member of CPSU must obey all decisions of CPSU meaning, the decisions of the leadership of CPSU but they are supposed to ...


4

The answer by @JamesK is very good but misses some key points that I expand upon here. In a parliamentary system, when, as the Democrats do now, the majority party holds a very thin majority, a vote against the majority party position by a member of that party (or the majority coalition if it is made up of more than one party) on an issue which has not been ...


15

Discipline is a combination of the carrot and the big stick. In Westminster type Parliaments there are both: The carrot of "Vote the right way and you'll get a chance at promotion" and the stick of "losing the whip and facing automatic deselection at the next election." Neither is very effective in the US system. Ministers are not ...


0

According to the deal announced between Schumer and McConnel, the sum is now $480 billion. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Thursday morning that lawmakers have reached a deal on a short-term debt ceiling increase after hours of discussion with Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. [...] The agreement, according to people familiar with the deal, ...


7

With US democracy (and many others) it is a principle that a person is elected as representative. In other words the people of District A do not just vote for "the Democratic party" but for "John Q Smith" who happens to be a member of the Democratic party. The Democratic party has specifically chosen to put John Q Smith as their candidate ...


1

Did Senate Democrats change the frequency with which the Budget Reconciliation process can be used? TLDR - Yes, it seems so. Meta Background: This is about the procedural rules of the US Senate, which can technically be changed with a simple majority. See the nuclear option, US vs Ballin Background: The budget reconciliation process allows the US Senate to ...


1

The "danger" is a strategic one for Democrats. Senate rules only allow two reconciliation bills per year. Democrats already used the first one to pass the American Rescue Plan Act (the COVID-19 stimulus bill) back in March. Democrats will need the second reconciliation bill to pass Joe Biden's $3.5 trillion "Build Back Better" plan, but ...


3

According to Ryan Grim her opinions are "private", so there won't be an official list... but some do get leaked out (since they apparently circulate among Senators), which is almost certainly how the press ends up quoting from them. (I don't know if there's an unofficial repository somewhere.)


1

I can't vouch for the procedural accuracy of these claims, but the problem seems to be that the procedure would take around 10 days, and the US at best has 26 days before it defaults (according to that source). Other sources say Oct 15 might be the day of default, so that would give less room. There's a procedural dispute whether the thing can be done ...


13

Every bill to be considered by the Senate is subject to debate. In the case of the debt ceiling, that debate may be filibustered; that is, subject to endless debate. To end the debate requires a cloture vote -- a vote to end debate and proceed to the vote for the bill. Even if Democrats have control of the Senate, won't new legislation just be blocked ...


0

No, the presiding Chief Justice only has the responsibility of enforcing the rules of order (time limits for each side to speak, reading the results of the final impeachment vote, etc.) The Justice in this case is a referee and not allowed any say in the activities of Senate or in whether there is a conviction or not. Senators may choose to excuse themselves ...


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