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1

No, it is not an issue. Assuming the nominee has not personally engaged in unethical acts (such as offering a quid pro quo for appointment) then they haven't done anything wrong and therefore have no ethical case to answer. The nomination process itself is laid down in the constitution and is political by design; the assumption was that there would be at ...


2

That is assuming that the nomination has to go through the Judiciary committee which isn't true as that is something that was added in order to provide a screening process but not required. If they are unable to get enough members for a committee meeting there is nothing to stop them from just going straight to the full senate. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


18

It happens all the time, though less so recently. If we assume you're only talking only about the Supreme Court, 1 Democrat, Senator Joe Manchin voted to confirm Kavanaugh, while 3 Democrats, Heidi Heitkamp, Joe Manchin, and Joe Donnelly, voted to confirm Gorsuch


3

Since Justice Ginsburg's death, there is no senator who has stated they will not vote to confirm a replacement (as of September 21, 2020). Speculation continues for some senators. For instance, Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski have said in September that they oppose a nomination this close to an election but neither has definitively ruled out voting for a ...


2

Yes, they’re hoping that McConnell will back down if he realizes he doesn’t have the votes. These senators are in a tricky position: going against Trump is very dangerous for a Republican, but they also want to avoid antagonizing moderate and swing voters (and they may also feel personally uncomfortable with ramming through a new justice). These more vague ...


10

The "list" is a list of potential nominees. Each president makes their own list. The president selects one nominee and sends that name to the Senate for confirmation. (This does not preclude private conversations between the president and trusted members of the Senate about which name to send.) The Senate Judiciary committee holds hearings for that ...


17

The NY Times article talks about the possibility of the confirmation vote on a Supreme Court Justice taking place during a lame-duck session - a Senate session occurring between election day in November and the convening of the new Senate on January 3rd 2021. Even if President Trump loses the November presidential election, he will remain President until ...


57

It is not possible for Democrats to filibuster the nomination under the current Senate rules, due to Mitch McConnell's use of the 'nuclear option' in 2017 which allowed a nomination debate to be ended by a simple majority vote. In 2013, the Senate voted 52-48 to change the number of votes needed for a successful cloture vote (a vote to end a filibuster) on ...


19

CNN At least 4 GOP senators have said they will oppose a vote for a new justice before the election, 9/18/2020 Here is a list of four Republicans senators who have said they will oppose a vote before the election: Maine Sen. Susan Collins told the New York Times, “I think that’s too close, I really do." Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski in September said, &...


12

The House of Representatives plays no part in the process. The Senate can refrain from confirming the nominee, as we all know well from four years ago. However, when the Senate is controlled by the president's party, as it is now, that outcome is rather unlikely.


2

Only the Senate ratifies treaties; the House of Representatives has no role. Only the Senate confirms appointments of officers by the president, including members of the cabinet, federal judges including Supreme Court justices, ambassadors, federal district attorneys, federal marshals, the FBI director, the postmaster general, etc. (There is only one office ...


2

A US Senator generally more powerful than a US Representative, yes. There are fewer senators so each one has more power. Senate rules generally give individual senators more power (in part because there are fewer senators to manage) and Senate leaders less power. The filibuster is one such rules but there are many such procedural rules. Conversely, since ...


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