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I've approached this question by looking at the General Election before each party leader attained their post, for Westminster party leaders of the Lib Dem, Labour, & Conservative parties selected since the 1992 GE. I then look at the distribution of 'percentage majority' among MPs of the same party, and find the percentile in which the leader appeared. ...


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The answer to this question is in the term "Party System". A party system is some stable group of political parties, poised in equilibrium - sometimes one wins, sometimes another does, but they generally represent the same things, are built from the same coalitions, and have their influences wax and wane but they can be viewed as being roughly the ...


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This is a myth that has been brought up several times in history. However an examination of history shows that this is not the case. The confusion comes from two factors: Social changes over time and the trying to fit in the ideologies of liberalism and conservatism into the two parties in discussion. In the end the political base of the parties have ...


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I would largely pin it down to the rule that third parties have to get more than 5% support in order to qualify for mainstream media coverage and to be included in cross debate with the Reps and the Dems during election time. It's amazing how many Americans think they only have 2 choices and the rules ensure that illusion exists


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The answer regarding first-past-the-post is an important one. However, it's also important to note that there are extremely onerous signature-gathering requirements in order to get ballot access for parties other than the big two. Jacobin looks at the issue in the context of American labor party politics, noting for instance that to get on the ballot in ...


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This isn't a complete answer, but a bit of evidence to support the assertion about the Republicans having a trademark on the modern elephant design (while the Democrats may not own their donkey). This article on a law firm's blog says: The Republican Party holds two registrations for its elephant logo in connection with political activities (Reg. No. ...


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I'm not terribly knowledge about the region and am figuring out a lot of this as I go, so I welcome any informed challenge on anything I say here. But my hypothesis right now is that it would be mistaken to assume that popular support for the PKK in Turkey and and the YPG in Syria are primarily based on their political ideologies. In each country, Kurds in ...


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If we start from the context of 'rebel group', we're going to miss all of the nuances of this issue. The fact is, a 'rebel group' only comes into existence when there is a long-term and pervasive dissatisfaction in a greater population. The IRA, Hezbollah, FARC, the KKK, and other violent militancies all arose because some group felt that 'their people' and '...


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