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2

No, I don't think it does because of how primaries are held. Depending on the state only members of the party may vote in the primary though Georgia is not one of those states. You also have to factor in the fact that there was no primary opponents for the GOP for President, Senate, House districts 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12 so there was not a lot of reason for ...


4

In a 2 party system like the US, voting for a fringe candidate in a tight race is essentially handing your least-preferred alternative a free vote. For example, people voting for Ralph Nader in 2000 contributed to getting Bush elected (whether you consider Bush's win good or bad is irrelevant to my argument) especially in swing states like Florida. People ...


-1

The two round Presidential direct election voting system existing in other countries does not bring considerable higher amount of voters in the first round (if at all). If we look on the data of other countries in recent presidential elections (voted directly). France 2017 - first round turnout 77.8%, second round turnout 74.6% Poland 2020 - first round ...


0

A few other observations. Gender, Geography and Religion Gender (as it intersects with race) The Pew study controls for many other factors, but not for gender. Military veterans are overwhelmingly male (about 92%). There is a strong gender divide between men and women on overall liberal to conservative political inclinations at this time. Consider, for ...


3

As an israeli (born and raised), I'll try my best to answer your question with as few English mistakes as I can. First thing to know is that Blue and White party was a combination of 3 smaller parties (Yesh Atid, Israel Resilience Party and Telem) they joined forces in order to build one bigger party that can form an alternative to Likud. A few month ago, ...


2

If by a bi-partisan commission you mean one that has 4 republicans (5 if you count DeJoy) and 2 (1 of which joined the commission after DeJoy was picked) Democrats all of whom were appointed by Trump? Even if the Democrats on the board of governors wanted to vote against him would it matter? It should also be noted that both Democrats have been appointed in ...


2

In short, the conditions that drive someone to join the military are correlated to a propensity to vote right wing. It's established that the poor are more likely to vote for a right wing party. The same can be said for a lack of education. It just so happens that the people entering the military tend to do so because it's one of their only options for ...


17

Person serving in the military is self-selected to work in hierarchical authoritarian system (except for people who have it as a family tradition). It is well documented that conservativism, traditionalism and authoritarianism are correlated I refuse the notion that conservatives are more patriotic. It is about priorities, Left-leaning are more interested in ...


6

The linked poll did not separate or adjust for gender, and since the military is mostly male, and males are more likely to support Trump and GOP, it's only natural that the veterans are more likely to support Trump and GOP than other Americans are. Another reason is likely the military's intrinsic nationalism, i.e. protecting the interests of your nation ...


56

The modern US military is self-selecting — a professional army, not a conscripted one — so I doubt this effect would hold true historically. But as a rule, the political Right tends to value military service as a symbol of deep patriotism. As a consequence, those who lean politically Right who want to serve the nation will be more likely to think of the ...


0

"Conservative" literally means "no change"; to conserve. Young people tend to be more open to change. When those overlap, you get "inconsistency" as you phrase it. Older liberals are already susceptible to change via attitude instead of age, reducing the potential for an age/openness mismatch. People don't typically ...


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