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5

Realistically, the same way that any law firm deals with large data dumps as part of the discovery process. There are a variety of software products that allow you to load and index a bunch of documents so that you can easily search them. Someone defines some key search terms (i.e. "App Store + Prime Video" if you're looking for anything relating ...


2

One issue which could come up is "at-large" districts. Currently, US law indicates that at-large districts are only legal for states with 1 house seat. If this law were repealed (it isn't a constitutional amendment; so, this is entirely possible and would be relatively simple) and, say, NY changed one of its district seats to an at-large seat, what ...


4

No, this is not a power that is given to the house and it was setup so that the house, senate and president all need to agree with the exception that if the president does exercise veto power it can be overridden with a 2/3rd vote in both the house and senate. Something to remember, though not directly related, is that in the 1990's congress tried to give ...


6

No The Constitution is clear that all bills must by passed by the House and the Senate. Here's the relevant excerpt from Article 1, Section 7: Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a law, be presented to the President of the United States Because of the rules of the Senate, a bill that has ...


51

No, the House of Representatives does not have the power to overrule a Senate veto. Article I, Section 7 is quite clear that a bill needs to pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate in order to become law. The two-chamber Congress was designed as a compromise between those founders who wanted every person to have an equal say in American ...


1

It appears to have been the 1996 election. Democrats won the popular vote by 0.06 percentage points. Due to previous results, this one appears to be the closest ever.


8

No, this has never happened before. The election with the fewest number of states which returned a different overall party winner, in terms of the state-aggregated vote count, was the 1888 Presidential Election, where only New Jersey voted differently - the state cast 98,562 votes for Democrat candidates compared to 105,468 for Republican candidates in the ...


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