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Ukraine-Russia - Do relevant world organizations provide an effective negotiation-center for this one, or have a suitable focus on doing so?

This can be seen as following the pattern of some cold-war conflicts, such as Soviet war in Afghanistan, or US war in Vietnam after the end of the Diem government. So we can use that 40 years of ...
Pete W's user avatar
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2 votes

Ukraine-Russia - Do relevant world organizations provide an effective negotiation-center for this one, or have a suitable focus on doing so?

There are two relevant concepts here in diplomatic practice: The term shuttle diplomacy describes the concept where negotiators from a third party (not necessary neutral but less involved) carry ...
o.m.'s user avatar
  • 108k
15 votes

Why do people in Central Asia view Russia in a positive light?

If you have ever been to Russia, you have probably noticed the large numbers of labour migrants from Central Asia doing the "unwanted" jobs (documented or undocumented). Tajikistan, ...
gerrit's user avatar
  • 48.1k
29 votes
Accepted

Why do people in Central Asia view Russia in a positive light?

This is hardly a "positive light". It's more of a neutral view of the situation, while not discarding a long-term strategic alliance with their closest trade partner. I've been in that ...
Therac's user avatar
  • 5,203
1 vote

Why would Putin or Russia benefit from a weak EU or weak EU countries?

Russia does not (necessarily) benefit per se from problems in the EU or in individual EU countries. What Russia does benefit from is the breaking apart of large, cohesive negotiating groups into ...
cjs's user avatar
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3 votes
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Why would Russia want to avoid a "disabling" arms race with the West?

Russia has lost a disabling military production war against the US before. That has cost it dearly: of the 300-million Soviet Union, 240 million of which was the former Russian Empire, it retained ...
Therac's user avatar
  • 5,203
3 votes

Why would Russia want to avoid a "disabling" arms race with the West?

In the long term you sure want to avoid being one of those two monkeys who fight under the hill, while the third monkey sitting on the hill reaps all the benefits. It's even worse when you are smaller ...
alamar's user avatar
  • 15.6k
9 votes

Why Russia is not launching another attack from the north on Ukraine?

Russia does not have enough immediate resources to open the second front line in the north without withdrawing troops and heavy weapons from the current one. It is obviously a military secret how much ...
Stančikas's user avatar
  • 20.2k
6 votes

Why Russia is not launching another attack from the north on Ukraine?

Why should Russia wish to open up another offensive on the Northern front, and advance beyond the defensive lines they have already built there, when they've only just got the Southern front moving ...
Steve's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Which European countries have laws that closely resemble the Russian law against discrediting the armed forces?

A OSCE paper from 2017, Scott Griffen (Author/Lead Researcher), Barbara Trionfi (Managing Editor): Defamation and Insult Laws in the OSCE Region: A Comparative Study (Commissioned by the OSCE ...
ccprog's user avatar
  • 7,958
13 votes

Which European countries have laws that closely resemble the Russian law against discrediting the armed forces?

Belarus. Reuters (2023-03-10): Under another change approved by Lukashenko on Thursday, anybody found guilty of "discrediting" the Belarusian armed forces will face a jail term. The ...
user103496's user avatar
  • 5,382
2 votes

Why did the West impose sanctions on Russia for the death of Navalny, but not on Ukraine for the death of Lira?

Russia is now being sanctioned, and Ukraine is not. Just the way things are. It is possible to put some new sanctions into connection with notable event like a death of the famous leader of the ...
Stančikas's user avatar
  • 20.2k
8 votes

Which European countries have laws that closely resemble the Russian law against discrediting the armed forces?

None, if you ask for "closely resembling". Surely, if you would publish in a press that famous NATO general keeps his dog in cage on nails and NATO troops rape girls in Ukraine, the only ...
Stančikas's user avatar
  • 20.2k
-1 votes

How reasonable are fears of Russia attacking any NATO country in the foreseeable future?

When you ask why Russia would entertain the idea of attacking a NATO country, you’re asking the wrong question. Countries don’t have ideas. The correct question to ask is why Putin would entertain the ...
Mike Scott's user avatar
  • 4,276
1 vote

How reasonable are fears of Russia attacking any NATO country in the foreseeable future?

Who knows? Recently TASS/Putin said Deportation of Russians from Latvia affects Russian security — Putin "The events that are taking place in Latvia and other Baltic countries now, when the ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
8 votes

Why did the West impose sanctions on Russia for the death of Navalny, but not on Ukraine for the death of Lira?

Other questions focus on the differences in motives for imprisonment. I'll look at the death instead. There are 3 types of deaths in prison: suspicious unforeseen but natural natural, but foreseen ...
Italian Philosophers 4 Monica's user avatar
12 votes

Why did the West impose sanctions on Russia for the death of Navalny, but not on Ukraine for the death of Lira?

You may think this is over the top, but some have argued that Lira's death was in part caused by Heavy smoking and medication skepticism. The 55-year-old Lira’s medical problems are a result of a ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
16 votes

Why did the West impose sanctions on Russia for the death of Navalny, but not on Ukraine for the death of Lira?

Fundamentally it would be inconsistent foreign policy to simultaneously sanction and fund the same country. But Lira and Navalny seem to be two very different characters in very different ...
Lag's user avatar
  • 5,880
10 votes

Why did the West impose sanctions on Russia for the death of Navalny, but not on Ukraine for the death of Lira?

Several reasons, each of which alone already suffices to explain the differences. Political reactions tend to follow notable events. Navalny was widely known, and thus his death widely reported. Thus,...
Arno's user avatar
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3 votes

Have household savings in Russia increased since 2022?

It turns out the CBR has this data in English. There was spike in household savings in 2022, right after the start of the war, and it's been higher than before the war since then, except for Q2 2022, ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
11 votes

Two years after the breakout of Ukraine war, is/how is Russia successful in sustaining its economy (now even growing?) and the war?

Disclaimer #1: I'm not an economist. Disclaimer #2: There's a lot of politically-charged coverage of the Russia-Ukraine war. A lot of news outlets try very hard to push the point of view that the ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 33.6k
2 votes

Two years after the breakout of Ukraine war, is/how is Russia successful in sustaining its economy (now even growing?) and the war?

As another answer already mentioned, the main factor contributing to this calculation is military spending. From the perspective of the civilian economy, military spending is inflationary spending. ...
wrod's user avatar
  • 9,080
7 votes

Two years after the breakout of Ukraine war, is/how is Russia successful in sustaining its economy (now even growing?) and the war?

Question: Two years after the breakout of Ukraine war, is Russia really successful in sustaining its economy (now even with a growing GDP) and the war? Or there is something I fail to realize about ...
JMS's user avatar
  • 3,791
25 votes

Two years after the breakout of Ukraine war, is/how is Russia successful in sustaining its economy (now even growing?) and the war?

The article you linked to already gives at least three explanations: First, growth appears to have been driven mostly by ramped-up spending on the military (Rightly or wrongly, GDP includes military ...
user103496's user avatar
  • 5,382
15 votes

Two years after the breakout of Ukraine war, is/how is Russia successful in sustaining its economy (now even growing?) and the war?

Whether it's sustainable it's too much of a crystal ball, IMHO. Russia's military/war budget fraction (of the budget) has doubled compared to the prewar, according to some Western analyses, (ibid). ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
-5 votes

Two years after the breakout of Ukraine war, is/how is Russia successful in sustaining its economy (now even growing?) and the war?

it is hard to believe that Russia could continue like this forever. It's not that hard to believe, because it has happened before. The fact that war spending stimulates the economy whilst peaceful ...
Steve's user avatar
  • 5,828
10 votes

Is the requirement of being aligned with the EU's foreign policy in order to join it written into law?

Yes, it is part of Chapter 31 of the acquis. Chapters which compliance is required to join the EU The common foreign and security policy (CFSP) and the European security and defence policy (ESDP) are ...
Nicolas Formichella's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Who were Sarkozy's "high-powered advisers with ethnic Russian backgrounds"?

It seems that the article by Le Nouvel Observateur is called « Sarko le Russe » - a reference to the Sarkozy's earlier nickname « Sarko l'americain ». For some reasons I cannot find the original ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
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1 vote

Did anybody challenge the credibility of Turner's claim over the anti-satellite nuclear weapon?

What was actually said aside, as for your claim based on (Russian, but also other experts) that such an attack is just fanciful, the DTRA considered it less so in a 2001 assessment titled: High ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
5 votes

Did anybody challenge the credibility of Turner's claim over the anti-satellite nuclear weapon?

Based on the later discussion in the press, it seems that: Turner himself didn't actually make that claim; he only said something more vague about a “serious national security threat”. While the ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Did Yeltsin participate in formal debates against other candidates for the Russian presidency?

No, it doesn't seem so. On Zyuganov's invitation in particular, Klebnikov's Godfather of the Kremlin: Life and Times of Boris Berezovsky states that "Yeltsin immediately rejected [Zyuganov's ...
CDJB's user avatar
  • 106k
1 vote

How can the US prevent Russia from deploying nukes in orbit/space without starting WW3?

All the media reports are currently speculating and there isn't any verifiable public data available on this subject. For all we know, it could just be: The American establishment creating anti-...
sfxedit's user avatar
  • 8,813
-2 votes
Accepted

How can the US prevent Russia from deploying nukes in orbit/space without starting WW3?

Develop equally capable system and then sign a treaty that neither side will deploy. This will not work if the system developed by USA would be significantly inferior. Ideally the counterweight system ...
Stančikas's user avatar
  • 20.2k
11 votes
Accepted

Is there any precedent of the Russian president skipping a debate during the presidential elections?

Vladimir Putin has never participated in a Presidential election debate -- not in 1991, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2018 or 2024. (Although in all fairness he wasn't a candidate in 1991, 1996, or, ...
Kelvin Sherlock's user avatar
6 votes

Any official Russian statement concerning Nord Stream sabotage?

In his interview with Tucker Carlson, Putin accused the CIA of undermining the Northern Streams. Since Putin is the most official representative of Russia, this can be considered an official statement ...
Olaf Leberwurst's user avatar
6 votes

What was (roughly) the frequency of official Hamas visits to Moscow during the Trump presidency?

Hamas leaders began regularly visiting Russia in March of 2006, just weeks after taking power in Gaza. As both powers are allies of the current regime in Iran, it is at minimum an enemy-of-my-enemy ...
Carduus's user avatar
  • 17.3k
6 votes
Accepted

What are the benefits Russia may gain from a strong relationship with Mongolia?

Geography Russia and Mongolia share a 3500 kilometer border (by comparison, the longest border in the world is the US-Canadian border of 8891 km.) It just makes good sense to have friendly ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
  • 18.9k
7 votes

What are the benefits Russia may gain from a strong relationship with Mongolia?

Russia has 2900 km of shared land border with Mongolia. Russia also has Republic of Tyva whose population is closely related with that of Mongola culturally and perhaps economically. Mongolia's trans-...
alamar's user avatar
  • 15.6k
4 votes

Why was Russia against NATO enlargement?

Neutral and explicit: From Russia point of view, NATO wants to build a military infrastructure around Russia and use it to attack. From the point of view of Baltic countries and countries recently ...
Stančikas's user avatar
  • 20.2k
4 votes

Why was Russia against NATO enlargement?

Let's not get over-complicated. Whatever Russia is up to, NATO was expressly brought into being as a counterweight to the USSR.
Italian Philosophers 4 Monica's user avatar
-7 votes

Why was Russia against NATO enlargement?

Despite NATO being originally designed as a defensive alliance rather than a military pact targeting Russia That's what NATO wants you to think. NATO is not a defensive alliance, and it was created ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 33.6k
10 votes

Did Putin ever talk with Zelensky directly after Zelensky became president?

via official communication channels They also talked by phone, on July 11, 2019 for instance. And possibly on other occasions. Putin and Zelensky talked about many issues: settlement of the conflict ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
-2 votes

Why was Russia against NATO enlargement?

Because saying straight out that they don't want Russia to be overran by the Chinese from the East would sound racist. So Russia had to invent reasons which would sound plausible without sounding ...
Radically Reasonable's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Why was Russia against NATO enlargement?

I think the concept you're looking for is "sphere of influence" (SoI). Every nation has an international sphere of influence — an array of nations in which it has political, economic, ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 69.1k
1 vote

Why was Russia against NATO enlargement?

I'm not sure what drives Kremlin so I will answer without mind reading: Imagine your neighbour saying: "We have two large countries bordering us, and we've just signed a defensive pact with the ...
alamar's user avatar
  • 15.6k
19 votes
Accepted

Did Putin ever talk with Zelensky directly after Zelensky became president?

They met on 19th December 2019, on invitation by French President Macron, and together with German Chancellor Merkel in Paris (the so-called Normandy format). An official statement about the meeting ...
ccprog's user avatar
  • 7,958
13 votes
Accepted

What does China have to gain from having a neutral stance concerning the ownership of the Kuril islands?

There's no way to know this with any certainty, unless China makes some statement about their [true] motivations for this move, which seems unlikely to me they'd reveal publicly. They could want some ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar

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