New answers tagged

5

The question as posed is probably none. Small highly trade dependent nations, such as oil rich Brunei, or Kuwait will be trading oil, and oil will provide a large amount of GDP. However WTO doesn't have much to do with the energy trade, there are other agreements that cover oil trade. Dijbouti has few resources and much of their business is in invisibles (...


12

Because many developed countries like the U.S. condemn China's new Security Law in Hong Kong, the 53 countries supporting China's crackdown on Hong Kong are outwardly China's allies. I colored in US even though Axio didn't. The full lists Supporting: China [I don't know why the website included China when China owns Hong Kong], Antigua and Barbuda, Bahrain,...


-1

The USA has three fundamental problems with Iran: Iran doesn't accept the existence of Israel. Iran wants to topple monarchy in Saudi Arabia. Iranian Islamic revolutionaries kept 52 American diplomats as hostages for 444 days where 8 Americans got killed. USA-Israel's relationship has nothing new to explain. Israel is the central piece of US foreign policy ...


15

The Confucius Institutes is a major educational initiative, and just one well-known example of how China has been making a "Big Bet on Soft Power" according to the Center on Foreign Relations. China enjoys favorable public opinion in many countries. In Russia and Nigeria public approval of China is over 70% as of 2019, and these are two major ...


11

China does not have 'official' close allies, especially not large ones. They are rather unique in their ideology (perhaps because of their size)? Quoting Wikipedia: Much of current Chinese foreign policy is reportedly based on Premier Zhou Enlai's Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, and is also driven by the concept of "harmony without uniformity&...


9

The short answer is that the practice of declaring war is no longer regarded as necessary; and as the other answers mention, it may provoke the other party, or force other countries to get involved. Wikipedia's article on declaring war states: Since 1945, developments in international law such as the United Nations Charter, which prohibits both the threat ...


17

I think the main reason is probably because, if it's an "irregular war," other nations with interests, agreements or obligations with either or both parties can pretend nothing, really, is going on. If a formal, internationally official war is declared, then nations and groups of nations would be more likely to act, either on their own, or by being ...


10

From the Ukraine side: official declaring war on Russia would rapidly end in Ukrainian defeat - as long as there would be no limits for using army power. Just because current proxy-war would lose word "proxy" and became full-conventional war. Ukrainian economics is critically dependent from Russian - in both import and export. From the Russian ...


2

CPTTP may offer one benefit. A desperate and weakened UK reeling from brexit will be unlikely to get a good deal by negotiating individual agreements. Each country will be looking to exploit the UK's weakness, having at best just lost substantial access to its biggest export market and likely in financial difficulty as a result. CPTTP was negotiated by more ...


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