New answers tagged

0

(This isn't a good fit for why some people saw fit to support protests and distancing at the time, but it is a good fit for why other people might want to reconsider pointing fingers now *.) Why protests didn't spread covid basically has scientists looking at cell phone data, something that has been done before wrt covid go gauge how much follow official ...


2

I’ll admit that I cannot speak for any BLM protestors or organisers in the United States as I am not in that country and haven’t been following that country’s news too much. I have, however, taken part in the peaceful BLM marches in Osaka and Kyoto and can cite from their Twitter accounts. Obviously, individual motivations will all be different and Japan is ...


3

According to the Black Lives Matter website, one of the partner organizations that Black Lives Matter supports is called the Movement for Black Lives. The Wikipedia article on the Movement for Black Lives includes a discussion of this coalition's original platform. It's six general points are: End the war on black people Reparations Invest-Divest Economic ...


27

Among protesters: they are generally aware that they are doing something dangerous and/or will help spread COVID-19, but are protesting anyway, typically for some personal or ideological reason. From this Chicago Sun-Times article: “It’s not OK that in the middle of a pandemic we have to be out here risking our lives,” Spence Ingram said Friday after ...


15

PRIORITIES It's not that the people supporting the protests think that social distancing suddenly doesn't matter. They feel that stopping systemic racism and extra-judicial executions that are a part of that are important enough to take that risk. Many of the protests that were ridiculed by people supporting preventative measures were ones of complaining ...


4

It may take time before someone really studies this and comes up with meaningful numbers, especially on the national level. One helpful way of approaching the question would be through insurance claims. According to The Real Deal, as of early June: Verisk Analytics subsidiary Property Claim Services declared the civil disorder in Minneapolis to be a “...


26

Public health officials and experts haven't said that COVID-19 doesn't spread during protests, but they've recognized that systemic racism and police brutality are also public health epidemics that are dangerous and deadly. While they've suggested ways that protesters and law enforcement officers can help mitigate the spread of COVID-19, they are firmly in ...


63

The key difference is that as our understanding of COVID-19 has improved, two facts have become clear about its infectivity which reduce the danger of spread during large outdoor protests like the ones that have occured over the killing of George Floyd. This article from Wired provides a good summary of the evidence: Masks are quite effective at reducing the ...


54

I don't know of any politician or institutions that has made an explicit justification, and I'm not certain any have seen a need to. One would only need to offer an explicit justification if one were trying to organize a protest: trying to convince people they should break quarantine and take to the streets. But these protests have largely been organic, ...


6

Precedent is strongly against treating a sit-in as an insurrection. It was not done when sit-ins were much more frequent during the 1960's. It was not done in 2016 when a federal facility, the headquarters of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, was occupied for several weeks.


0

This question is loaded with several different unrelated problems. It could be answered much better if it'd be split in separate parts. To answer this question directly, considering exactly how it is formulated: because nothing in police job description says that their behavior should change in any way because of "international focus" or any "international ...


71

I'm a local, I've been in the zone the last couple days. I'm not qualified to give a legal or historical answer, but I want to make a few points about the nature of the zone, that hopefully can inform more historical answers. It's not special. The police of the East Precinct voluntarily left, they were not driven out (like Minneapolis 3rd Precinct was). ...


51

In strictly rational terms, it would be difficult to call this an act of insurrection. There has been no armed conflict, no declarations of independence or sovereignty, no expressed intention of overthrowing even the local government, and police and government officials are not being prevented from entering the area. Instead, Seattle police and officials ...


1

Defining and using an appropriate level of force in a high pressure situation is really challenging and requires good police training and organisational support. This doesn't excuse deliberate abuses of power but it does make abuse harder to distinguish from poor police practice or mistakes in the heat of the moment. Some complicating factors: Complexity ...


29

It's important to distinguish between the BLM network, co-founded by Patrisse Khan-Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi, and the BLM movement, which is a far less well-defined collection of anti-racism groups and individuals. The New Yorker describes the latter as "eschewing hierarchy and centralized leadership". The BLM movement has a very loose ...


40

It is the President who gets to decide. 10 U.S. Code §252 "Use of militia and armed forces to enforce Federal authority" says: Whenever the President considers that unlawful obstructions, combinations, or assemblages, or rebellion against the authority of the United States, make it impracticable to enforce the laws of the United States in any State by ...


5

The police will (generally) only investigate a crime if there a chance of finding a culprit that would be convicted. Since 1986 in the UK the decision to prosecute has been in the hands of the Crown Prosecution Service. The police will consult with the CPS early in an investigation in order to determine whether they are pursuing a worthwhile investigation. ...


2

The killing of George Floyd was a disgusting act caught on video and widely published. The video produced a strong emotional reaction which spurred many people to action (to do something, anything, right now), and the emotion seemed to sustain itself. Soon, the focus of the protest moved almost completely beyond the facts of the case involving Floyd. ...


19

I don't think it is a complicated answer. Police rarely get charged with using excessive force. This is partly systemic, because in the U.S., District Attorneys need the police to testify in their cases, and they cannot risk angering the police and losing testimony, or making the police look bad, which would also complicate their cases. If prosecuted, ...


5

A quick partial answer which I can turn into a comment if not good enough. You asked what caused the delay. I am a Bristolian. Some people opposed removing the statue because Colston was a benefactor to the city. There's streets, a concert hall and two schools named after him. Not an excuse for it still being there long after it should have gone to a museum, ...


53

Did you ever watch the TV show "Cops?" I watched a lot of it. My take-away was that even in non-high-stress situations, cops have little tolerance for anything from "perps," except "yes, officer," "no, officer," and "just tell me what you want and I'll gladly do it, officer." Anything else, and you'll likely find yourself handcuffed on the ground with a knee ...


12

tl;dr: The death of George Floyd was not an isolated incident, it's the larger system people want to change. These 4 officers were charged, but convictions in police misconduct cases are exceedingly rare. See for example Five Thirty Eight's statistics, and the riots after the police charged with use of excessive force on Rodney King were acquitted (back ...


29

There are a few things that keep putting fuel on this fire. The media likes to sell, and violence is exciting. There have been over 700 protests.[1] But only around 20 have ended up in violence.[2] Of course it can depend a lot on definitions of violence and protest. But many protests are peaceful. (That does not mean we should not do something about the ...


42

The answer to this question is more a matter of psychology than policy. There are a few psychological factors to keep in mind: Police officers (and protesters as well) are enmeshed in a tense situation, and often lack a proper perspective on their own behavior. It's a kind of tunnel-vision in which an officer is focused on himself and those immediately ...


112

One data point seems to be the 75 year old who was seriously injured when he was knocked backwards by police. When the policemen who did this were suspended the entire squad resigned from the Emergency Response Team (but not their day jobs) in protest. John Evans, president of the local police union, told the newspaper: "Our position is these officers ...


Top 50 recent answers are included